Revamping the legal framework for the Chinese banking system

a critical examination
  • 48 Pages
  • 1.50 MB
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  • English
by
International Financial & Tax Law Unit, Centre for Commercial Law Studies, Queen Mary & Westfield College, University of London, in cooperation with London Centre for International Banking Studies and London Institute of International Banking, Finance & Development Law , [London]
Banking law -- C

Places

C

StatementHuang Yang Xin.
SeriesStudies in international financial & economic law,
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKNQ940 .H83 1996
The Physical Object
Pagination48 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL299912M
LC Control Number97206831

Get this from a library. Revamping the legal framework for the Chinese banking system: a critical examination. [Yang Xin Huang]. Chapter Nineteen.

The Gats and the Legal Framework of the Chinese Banking Sector in The World Trade Organization and Trade in ServicesCited by: 1. 'An excellent book. Wei Wang provides invaluable information on China's GATS/WTO obligations and its banking laws.

Importantly, based upon China's economic and political reforms, the book proposes an integrated legal framework to provide a systematic resolution to existing weaknesses in the treatment and approach towards foreign and domestic banks.'Format: Hardcover.

tion.

Description Revamping the legal framework for the Chinese banking system FB2

But the Chinese banking system is facing a big challenge. In many respects, legal changes have not fully permeated the actual operational level. Above all, the system has to deal with alarmingly large amounts of nonperforming assets. A rigorous esti-mate would indicate that Chinese banks are already operating in the negative capital base.

Unless theFile Size: KB. Reviews 'An excellent book. Wei Wang provides invaluable information on China's GATS/WTO obligations and its banking laws. Importantly, based upon China's economic and political reforms, the book proposes an integrated legal framework to provide a systematic resolution to existing weaknesses in the treatment and approach towards foreign and domestic banks.'.

formal banking system.7 In China, this system includes a diverse range of financial products, trust and guarantee companies, brokerage firms, cooperative associations, pawn shops, and informal lenders.8 Given its heterogeneity and relative opacity, it is difficult to measure the size of the Chinese shadow banking system with any by: 8.

But, if the Chinese start to throw around money in the same fashion that Americans do, it will push the banking system to breaking point. The Chinese government has created a safe bubble for banks.

China’s banking system can be seen as an enigma. It was once ­considered China’s Achilles’ heel but has now become an important part of the country’s success story.

Arguably, the major problem in the Chinese banking sector is the high level of NPLs and continued lending to loss-making SOEs. Until recently, banking reforms were mainly focused on introducing competition, 4 broadening the channels of financial intermediation and providing a legal framework for bank supervision.

Innotable developments. The Chinese banking system is critical to the functioning of the Chinese economy, being the main conduit through which savings are allocated to investment opportunities.

Revamping the legal framework for the Chinese banking system By H.Y. Xin and London (United Kingdom). International Finance and Tax Law Unit Queen Mary and Westfield Coll. As these changes continue to take shape, the Chinese banking system continues to undergo a program of reform to transition from state to private ownership and to support the economy's move Author: Caroline Banton.

ELECTIVE PAPER BANKING LAW AND PRACTICE The students may refer to the given books and websites for further knowledge and study of the subject: READINGS 1. revised by: Banking Law and Practice, Wadhwa & Company, Nagpur C.R.

Datta & S.K. Kataria 2. A.B. Srivastava and: Seth’s Banking Law, Law Publisher’s India (P) Limited. banking reform, among other issues, has attracted the great attention of global financial markets and policymakers. Banks play the key role in economic growth for both developed countries and under development countries.

This paper takes a closer look at banking reform Author: Wen Si. Chinese banking system 1. State of the Chinese economy and the Chinese banking system 2. Project Director Acknowledgements Trevor Tsui (IV LL.B / Commerce) Project Analysts Lisa Chhang (II Commerce) Eugina Kwon (II LL.B / Commerce) Buwaneka Arachchi (II LL.B / Commerce) Sam Tidswell (II LL.B / Commerce) Shirley Song (II LL.B / Commerce) Olivia Guo.

Details Revamping the legal framework for the Chinese banking system FB2

After almost a year since the draft revised Regulations on the Administration of Foreign Invested Bank 1 (the Regulations) were published for public comment, the formal Regulations were promulgated on Octo The formal version of the Regulations does not differ very much from the previous draft, but compared to the version, there are quite a number of notable changes that.

This book proposes a set of reforms that would at the same time create a legal environment for competitive equality between foreign banks and protect the Chinese banking system.

The issues considered include the licensing process for the entry of foreign banks into the Chinese market, the ongoing regulation of foreign banks and foreign bank crisis management or bank failure : Zhongfei Zhou. Chinese banks have been making headlines recently, but what lies beneath.

Banking in China appears different. What explains the current arrangement. What can we expect from such a banking industry in the future. This book answers these two questions in a fully revised second edition and contributes to a new understanding of Chinese banks.

Emerging Sustainability Frameworks China Development Bank and China Export-Import Bank sustainable banking in all Chinese banks. Over the past two decades, Chinese authorities Banking system: Policy banks, commercial banks, commercial banks, etc.

by some observers as a catalyst for subsequent banking system reforms (Walter and Howie ). Box A Evolution of the Modern Chinese Banking System Prior to the late s, the Chinese banking system consisted of only one bank – the People’s Bank of File Size: KB.

The financial system is unbalanced and securi-ties markets are dwarfed by a banking system that is large measured against Chinese GDP, and deep—by the same measure—even when compared with developed economies. The banking system domi-nates the financial system, even under circumstances and duringFile Size: KB.

Shadow Banking Modes: The Chinese versus US System* In this paper we employ a unified theoretical framework based on the concept of information sensitivity by Dang et al (, a) to model Chinese shadow banking with the focus on the directions for reform and regulation of the system.

Chinese Shadow BankingFile Size: KB. Keywords Banking regulation, Banking regulation in China, Banking, China Paper type Research paper I. Introduction Inthe 16th Chinese Communist Party National Meeting called for reform in the financial sector (Zemin, ).

Privately owned enterprises were recognized as an essential component of the financial Size: KB. Time for Revamping the Building Management Ordinance (Cap.

) In view of the increasing number of large-scale developments (such as Mei Foo Sun Chuen) in late s, the Hong Kong Government promulgated the Multi-storey Buildings (Owners Incorporation) Ordinance (Cap.

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) in June to provide a basic legal framework for property owners to. China vows to revamp banking system. the World Bank say an overhaul of a Chinese banking system that lends little to private businesses is urgently needed to.

edition of Banking Regulation: Its Purposes, Implementation, and Effects not only reflects these objectives, but reaffirms our inten-tions to bring about a greater understanding of the U.S. banking system and its supervisory framework. The four previous editions of this book have been widely used.

CHAPTER 24 Reforms of China’s Banking System Indeed, the Chinese government put into place a $ billion stimulus package to prevent the growth of the economy from slowing too much due REFORMS OF CHINA’S BANKING SYSTEM. of China China.

20 Banking. This paper further examines the implications of the WTO agreements and Basel accords on the Chinese Banking System. The WTO agreements signed by China in will open up the China banking system to foreign investors and allow them to operate in the retail markets in domestic currency without any business or geographical limitations.

It focuses on the relationship between GATS/WTO national treatment obligations and China's banking law. Tracing the history of national treatment in China, the book compares the treatment of foreign-funded banks with the treatment of Chinese-funded banks and examines the structure and shortcomings of the existing banking law framework in : Wei Wang.

China's Banking System Won't Collapse, Former Bank Director Says from inside the nation’s banking system. His book is published by and the hunger for Chinese to make the banking system. This book proposes a set of reforms that would at the same time create a legal environment for competitive equality between foreign banks and protect the Chinese banking system.

The issues considered include the licensing process for the entry of foreign banks into the Chinese market, the ongoing regulation of foreign banks and foreign bank.Basel III: international regulatory framework for banks The Basel III reforms have now been integrated into the consolidated Basel Framework, which comprises all of the current and forthcoming standards of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision.A bank in Singapore (“Reporting Bank”) which is an internationally active bank or has been notified by MAS that it is a domestic systemically important bank (“D-SIB”) need only comply with the LCR framework.

The framework provides for a detailed assessment of the bank’s liquidity as well as the buffer that the bank would be required.